PCN Contravention Codes – On Street Parking


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01
Parked in a restricted street during prescribed hours

02
Parked or loading/unloading in a restricted street where waiting and loading/unloading restrictions are in force

04
Parked in a meter bay when penalty time is indicated

05
Parked after the expiry of paid for time at a pay & display** bay

06
Parked without clearly displaying a valid pay & display ticket**

07
Parked with payment made to extend the stay beyond initial time (‘meter feeding’)

08
Parked at an out-of-order meter during controlled hours

09
Parked displaying multiple pay & display tickets where prohibited

15
Parked in a residents’ parking space without clearly displaying a valid residents’ parking permit

16
Parked in a permit space without displaying a valid permit

20
Parked in a loading gap marked by a yellow line

21
Parked in a suspended bay/space or part of bay/space

22
Re-parked in the same parking place within one hour* of leaving

23
Parked in a parking place or area not designated for that class of vehicle

24
Not parked correctly within the markings of the bay or space

25
Parked in a loading place during restricted hours without loading

26
(London Only) Vehicle parked more than 50 cm from the kerb and not within a designated parking place

30
Parked for longer than permitted

34
Vehicle seen contravening bus lane regulations

35
Parked in a disc parking place without clearly displaying a valid disc

36
Parked in a disc parking place for longer than permitted

40
Parked in a designated disabled person’s parking place without clearly displaying a valid disabled person’s badge.

41
Parked in a parking place designated for diplomatic vehicles

42
Parked in a parking place designated for police vehicles

45
Parked on a taxi rank

46
Parked on a clearway where stopping is prohibited

47
Parked on a restricted bus stop/stand

48
Stopped in a restricted area outside a school***

49
Parked wholly or partly on a cycle track

55
A commercial vehicle parked in a restricted street in contravention of the Overnight Waiting Ban

56
Parked in contravention of a commercial vehicle waiting restriction

57
Parked in contravention of a coach ban

60
Parked on an urban road with one or more wheels resting on a footway, land between two carriageways, grass verge, garden or space

61
A heavy commercial vehicle wholly or partly parked on a footway, verge or land between two carriageways

62
Parked with one or more wheels on any part of an urban road other than a carriageway (footway parking)

63
Parked with engine running where prohibited

* Or other specified time
** Or voucher
*** Sometimes applies during term time only

PCN Contravention Codes – Off Street Parking (Car Parks)




70
Parked in a loading area during restricted hours without reasonable excuse

77
- - - RESERVED FOR DVLA USE - - -

80
Parked for longer than the maximum period permitted

81
Parked in a restricted area in a car park

82
Parked after the expiry of time paid for in a pay & display** car park

83
Parked in a pay & display** car park without clearly displaying a valid pay & display ticket**

84
Parked with additional payment made to extend the stay beyond time first purchased

85
Parked in a permit bay without clearly displaying a valid permit

86
Parked beyond the bay markings

87
Parked in a disabled person’s parking space without clearly displaying a valid disabled person’s badge

88
- - - DELETED - - -

89
Vehicle parked exceeds maximum weight and/or height permitted in the area

90
Re-parked within one hour* of leaving a bay or space in a car park

91
Parked in an area not designated for that class of vehicle

92
Parked causing an obstruction

93
Parked in car park when closed

99
Stopped on a pedestrian crossing and/or crossing area marked by zig-za

As with everything else they do, the power of councils to enforce parking regulations derives ultimately from Acts of Parliament.

The Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 first enabled councils to enforce certain parking acts, although parking offences were dealt with and enforcement action taken through the criminal court system. A considerable number of parking offences, primarily those concerning restricted (yellow line) parking remained the responsibility of the police and the police traffic warden service.

The Road Traffic Act 1991 brought about a number of key changes in the above arrangements. Parking “offences” enforced by councils were “decriminalised” and brought within the civil enforcement system. At the same time a number of additional enforcement responsibilities, such as restricted (yellow line) parking, were removed from the police and also given to councils.

The provisions of the Road Traffic Act 1991 were first implemented by the 33 London Boroughs during 1993/94. Since the late 1990s an increasing number of councils outside London have also taken up decriminalised enforcement powers. It is these councils in England and Wales, (not including London), for whom the National Parking Adjudication Service provides the independent appeals service required by the Road Traffic Act 1991.

Before any council can take up decriminalised enforcement powers it must first prepare a detailed proposal which is submitted to the Secretary of State for Transport (in England) or for Secretary of State for Wales. Only once this has been approved and the council’s scheme is deemed to be viable, will permission be given to prepare for and introduce a decriminalised parking enforcement regime.

Legal powers to implement the scheme are granted formally through the enactment of what is known as an Order in Parliament, through the Statutory Instrument process. All councils operating decriminalised parking must be in possession of such an Order, known as a Special Parking Area Order (SPA Order), before they commence enforcement.

Along with the Acts of Parliament mentioned above, the Road Traffic (Parking Adjudicators) (England and Wales) Regulations 1999 (S.I. 1999 No. 1918) govern the management and conduct of parking appeals in England and Wales (outside London).

Many items of legislation, particularly recent ones, may be viewed on the Her Majesty’s Stationery Office website. Click on the link here to go straight to this site. http://www.legislation.hmso.gov.uk Copies should also be held at in main reference libraries and of course at HMSO shops.